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this is the regular meeting of the board of education of san francisco unified school district for september 25, 2012 is now called to order. roll call please. (roll call). >> thank you. >> if you would like to join us for the pledge of allegiance. pledge one and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. okay. i get the first word. giants go. another world series champion. okay. seriously let's get back to the agenda. item a approval of board minutes for the regular minutes of march 13, 2012, august 14, 2012, september 11, 2012. is there a motion for all three? >> [inaudible] >> is there a second. >> second. >> any corrections? roll call please. >> thank you. >> yes. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for being here in the board room. just a few thoughts to shar
board of education and the san francisco board of supervisors. the city and school district select committee. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the committee. madam secretary, if you can please take the roll? before we do that i wanted to thank the following members of sfgtv staff who are covering the meeting today. mark bunch and bill dylan. madam secretary. >> did you want me to read the first item? >> roll call. >> roll call. we haven't had one. supervisor campos? >> present. >> supervisor olague? >> here. >> thank you. supervisor chu? >> he's in route. >> [speaker not understood]? >> here. >> [speaker not understood]? >> and commissioner mendosa. >> here. >> thank you very much. madam secretary, if you can please call item number 1. >> thank you, supervisor. it's item 120 3 93, hearing on the student drop out rates as introduced by supervisor cohen. >> this is an item that has been introduced by supervisor cohen. before i turn it over to supervisor cohen, i want to thank her for being here. i just wanted to sort of just make a quick note about these items, number of
and the rest of the elementary grades, but also focusing on the students that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it over to public comment. i think it's really important for us to hear from members of the public. so, i have a number of speaker cards that i'm going to read. but any member of the public who would like to speak on items 1 and 2, i would ask that you come forward. so, the speaker cards are from sharon hewett, robert woods, lilly ratcliff, jamil patterson, peter alexander, and ace washington. please come up. you each have two minutes. and we also have shaman walton. >>> hi, i'm [speaker not understood], and i did not fill out a card. i do apologize. one thing we're talking about solutions. first i wanted you to picture this. my kids' friends, when i encourage them to go back to school after they graduate, say, hey, i'm not going to live beyond 21. what for? there's hopeless
, cut. and reenvig rate what our priorities are. the example is education verses the bullet train, i don't think that we can have both right now. >> thank you. >> mr. leno? >> yes. what i have learned through ten years of working in the state legislature, is we have a very serious and significant governor nans problem and that is two-thirds vote requirement on the most important issue of the day which is revenue. we have seen our revenue cut significantly by taxes that arnold schwarzenegger cut his first day in office. we have a depoll that prop is trying to refill it. we should not have to do it at the ballot box when out of 40 state senators 14 have more power than 26. 14 can veto when 26 want. i tell fifth graders that and they say that is not democracy that is not possible. that is exactly the problem, we don't have democracy on all issues, revenue-related in the legislature, let the majority party do its job and if the voters don't like what the majority party is doing in no one jerry man dered districts change who is in power, it is call democracy. >> continuing on the theme of dem
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
and department development support education out dumb comeses. and i'll give you examples of acat this timetionv we've funded so far that helps to bridge the gap. -- activities. what has made us unique in the current and upcoming cycle is we have made education our focus for three years and the upcoming three-year. ultimately want to make sure our students are ready to learn and are succeeding in school. and more importantly we cannot be doing these without addressing some of the preconditions. as supervisor cohen asked earlier how can we fixed this, there is education effort. we must address student needs, wellness and also safety. our stretch goals are to make sure that every child is ready to learn. every child is ready when they are beginning high school, every youth enters high school ready to succeed and when they are finished with high school they're ready to transition to adulthood. you'll see each of our strategies are broken out to target early care education, kindergarten through 8, out of school time and work with students who are in ninth grade through 12th grade. our funding also s
members. any appointments? commissioner wynn. >>i would like to appoint brian fox to the public education enenrichment committee. >> yes, i have two and -- [inaudible] to the public education enrichment fund. >> any others? okay. seeing none let's move on to the next item. this is the item l, special order of business. i now call the public hearing and adoption of the tentative agreement between the district and the international federation of technical engineers, local 21. is there a motion? >> so moved. >> is there a second? >> second. >> reading of recommendation by superintendent or designee. >> thank you president yee. this say tentative agreement that we reached with local 21 r and extension of the existing collective bargaining agreement and we ask that the board adopt that agreement and the required public disclosure requirements. i want to thank the bargaining teams from local 21. they represent our it work force. >> so there's no public speakers that signed up for this and are there comments from the board or the superintendent? seeing none roll call please. >> thank you
to plan a robust education and notification to customers about this program. that involves paid media, partnering with community-based organizations to make sure we are really talking through folks who have contacts within the communities. and it is a community engagement program. we expect to be partnering with other city departments, including the department of environment as we embark on this education and notification program. you will see on the consent agenda, 8c has us procuring additional resources through a contract so we will have an extensive outreach program. i wanted to also take a moment to remind the commission of the steps that we had been asked to -- conditions rather, we had been asked to meet prior to launching the program. these are simply the conditions that you had articulated us to meet in the resolution you approved in advance of going to the board of supervisors for approval. so this is a quick summary of those conditions. i can say that -- i can give you a quick status on each of those. so clean power s.f. rates have to be approved by pickup -- puc and board
education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted an a through g graduation requirement to do two things, one is to give access so tha
only create safe schools for the long term if students, educators and community based organizations play a key role in identifying and creating implementing strategies to deal with safety concerns and causes of crime. students, educators and cbos know their schools and communities better than anyone else. they spend their time in them and have created relationships that give them access to information to know how to deal with safety concerns. we all know enforcement alone will never address crime at its roots. we must consider the community-based organizations to support our youth. they are as important as maintaining safe schools and communities just as sfpd. so, as you continue to hear the rest of our youth today, we look to you to address the concerns and understanding that youth input and participation is vital to providing input and feedback to ongoing police and teacher training, providing sufficient resources to our schools, measuring and defining safe schools, on a personal note i attended balboa high school many years ago. and, you know, looking at the bars and the gates, i
. with regard to the board of education and board of sups, i'd like to see -- hover is gone. in terms of institutional history and leveraging more, how that happened and maybe didn't happen or what was supposed to happen, really beginning to engage and have conversations around that, but beginning to drill down and actually have some movement. i think that it's important to have people who know the history but also have people who are living right now to make decisions to leave the city because of [inaudible]. some of the other things. >> thank you. >>> thank you. >> is there any other member of the public who has not spoken who would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. colleagues, we have another also pretty substantive item that is still on the agenda. but i want to give you wang opportunity to make some wrapping remarks. obviously there's not going to be a solution for this very complicated issue, but i think it's important for us that we continue to talk about it. so, with that, supervisor olague. >> i want to make sure that, miss davis, were you able to complete
of the work is the alignment. i love the idea that early education is talking to kindergarten and they're talking to the larger community and it transfers over. we have step ahead for middle from elementary to middle school and the promise from middle schools to high schools and then all of the community base the organizations that helped to support the out of school time, the summer learning, the after school programming. if we didn't have all of those support mechanisms in place and a lot of the folks that have really dived into the work that we're doing and committed to our work then i don't know if we could actually be tooting our horn the way we are and i want to give a shout out to the community based organizations and frankly have told us these are the things that we need to do, so some have stayed with us in and out and the other thing i want to remind ourselves is that we made some conscious decisions to invest. we not only cut back on things but we also felt strongly about professional development, about making sure that college and career was really important, and we did g
these to transition to enforcement. as much as we educate and campaign and talk, there is still a role for enforcement. we've been working with the police department and your agency to focus on smart enforcement. the police surely don't have enough resources to be everywhere every minute. where do you put your energy. we think you should be putting your energy here. if we know these 20 intersections -- they're not all intersections, 20 locations are the worst and the most problematic, are where most people get hurt and should height vulnerable road users, people walking and biking, are 30 times more likely to be hurt at one of these intersections. if we know these are the problem, let's put our enforcement efforts there. i would be happe happy to go there and put our materials out. i would like to see the police department and the m.t.a. efforts focused on these locations. i would like to see you all coming back on an annual basis reporting, and letting them know how it goes. we know these are problem intersections, might will be a problem with the makeup of the street? possibly see. i'd love to see a
, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help
and decision makers in education of our children 84% of respondents on the survey agreed to this statement. agreed or strongly agreed to this statement. you can clap. [applause] okay. i am coming to my last two slides, so you can have a sigh of relief from numbers and how did sfusd perform compared to other school districts in california and how do you think we did? okay. so as you can see we are -- when we say we're one of the highest performing districts here is the performance of all the other districts. we just took a sample of five others as well as the state so the state is at 57% proficiency and we are at 61%. last year to this year the state moved from 54 to 57 and we moved from 57 to 61. 60.5 percent rounded was 61%. csd map -- again this is grades two through 11. you will see that the state is at 52%. we're at 57% proficiency. their growth was 50 to 52%. ours was 56 to 57%. and with that i am going to turn it back to -- what was the reason? the cause? the validity behind these, the best practices. >> thank you. so in looking how our sites performed overall, our sch
, these kids are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
the opportunity to do so. we've done a lot around education with the school district, educating kids about graffiti, how graffiti affects property owners, it affects the city. and things we've done, we've worked with the art commission. i think one of the funest things i was involved in was at that time deputy director nuru of dpw and i worked with the arts commission on what color the street furniture and lamp poles in san francisco should be and standardize that nice green color we have now and made it easier to paint out graffiti and keep a standard. so, dpw didn't have to carry around 10 different colors of paint with them to paint out graffiti. so, going forward what i'd really like to see is just really more education, more education, education with kids, with property owners around their responsibilities, with folks that get caught doing vandalism and grab feet and also education with the arts -- on avenues for people to express their creativity and that kind of thing. so. >> thank you, mr. giusti. i've seen you at many events. i appreciate your work and passion and for serving sinc
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
of them, 30 and 38. those are two measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly manage
passod tuesday. throughout those efforts we are also developing our kuft education and noteification program. we never intended to have goch you customers who were surprised to find us as the power provider under this program. we heard from the board and the mayor loud and clear that is a very key issue for you as policy makers as our policy guides, so we are incorporating more elements into that program and will be coming back to you and to the commission with that program proposal in draft form and get feedback to get that target. on the commission meeting of october ninth of next week -- the week after next, excuse me. we will present ou commission with an opportunity to award the contract for developing that program. we conducted a competitive bidding process to select a bidder, to select a counter party to develop that marketing and outreach program for us, and the commission will be asked to authorize us to sign a contract and begin that work. the rate fairness board meeting of october 12 is just one of the near term notice ones. we will have three or four more before we
of the debate. >> reporter: montgomery county educators as well as business and elected leaders came to campus today to make a point. supporters of question 7 say expanded gambling will mean hundreds of millions of dollars for education. money being spent by maryland residents in the casinos of neighboring states. >> there was a study that came out today that suggested $1.2 billion that marylanders are spending, that marylanders are spending in west virginia. >> reporter: the event took place at the university of maryland at shady grove. >> the university border reached a decision in support. the moneys coming in will be supporting education, education capital budgets. so this is important. >> reporter: we requested a response from the group opposing question 7. get the facts. vote no on 7 says just because money goes to the education trust fund doesn't mean that it will get to maryland kids. new revenues would be used for increased education funding. last week, this group of clergy and communicate activists in prince george's county said no to question 7. they don't want a casino built at nat
a reos de la cárcel . >>> como parte d ela semana de educaicon el programa "educate es tu momento " el nos habla que el titulo cambio su vida por los estudios. >>> aquí vemos que con una beca cambias la vida d euna persona . >>> hace años cuando ib a apresentar mis libros yo dije quien quiere ser el presidente de estados unidos y nadie levanto la mano y ahora fui y la levantaron 27 niños ellos tiene muchos problemas porque no pueden avanzar y yo entiendo que la calle esta muy duro y que dejan la universidad y comienzen a trabajar. >>> yo llega a estados unidos con pocas cosas y llegué con un titulo universitario y la educación cambio mi vida tanto aquí como en estados unidos la varita magica es estudiar y si lo haces es ahí cuando hay que aplicar y hay que estar preparados cuando este esta oportunidad. >>> es el momento educate y este jueves las noticias estar aen estas lugar veamos como pinta el clima gracias que tal buenas tardes feliz lunes y especiañmente el día de la raza y las temperatura son agradables y cambian un poco en un sistema de baja presion y vemos la nubos
. educators there are taken a different approach. >> reporter: in new jersey a new anti-bullying law took effect from september 2011. the state law once bullying is observed schools are required to look into it immediately, notify parents and take steps to tackle it. this middle school has the anti-bully bill of rights. the school counselor was appointed last year as the school's anti-bullying specialist. >> this is my anti-bullying bible. >> reporter: the law requires each school district to create its on antibullying program. the program sets out detail procedure to follow when bullying occurs and steps for dealing with the bully. when bullying is reported, they begin the investigation and contact offender. they also contact after school counseling. the law stipulates the student can be suspended or expelled and reported to the police if it's serious. >> the benefit about the law is it's a must so every school district has to handle a report in the same way. there's no gray area and it's not something that is really subjective. >> japan has no laws dealing with school bullying but local
broadcasting funds support shows including sesame street that provide educational programming for children especially those that cannot afford to go to preschool. the total money going to pbs accounts for roughly .00013% of the federal budget. that's a very small amount. despite utterly nominal amount of money on the table the president has been trumpeting the big bird message since the debate. >> thank goodness somebody is finally getting tough on big bird. >> governor romney plans to let wall street run wild again but he's going to bring down the hammer on sesame street. >> elmo has been seen in a white -- in a white suburban. he's driving for the boarder. >> here on the panel after a hellish commute mother jones washington bureau chief david corn author of the book "47%" uncovering the romney video that rocked the 2012 election. it ain't a over but that video did its share of rocking. >> before big bird hit the scene. >> exactly. david, let's talk about the big bird ad. a good thing for team obama to be using or a bad thing? >> you know, i've always been a fan in politics of what i call
modern governors with major improvements in education, public safety, welfare reform, and job creation. it described how i worked with leaders in the other party to get these good results for the people. the article also described tim's term as governor, bad economy, and his decision, his choice to spend the fourth year as governor serving as national party chairman rather than focusing on the dire economic crisis in virginia. it's really the great unanswered question in this campaign. how does a governor decide to take on a second job that sends him all over the country giving partisan speeches while over 100,000 jobs are lost here in virginia? if tim had given his governorship the full attention, he might have avoided some mistakes like increasing college tuition by over 30% or closing rest areas. if tim had been listening to the people of virginia who are really facing tough times, he might not have proposed raising taxes on working people, working women, seniors and small business owners, as well as people earning as little as 17b$,000 a year, and he might have been against the seq
the first question i went to princeton university i hope these guys are good to be well-educated and know something and the first question is where is your tomahawk? the borderland follows me everywhere. there was no way to escape it. the only way through it and so i realized there are not that -- i wouldn't be the barometer by which a lot of people what, you know, understand or judge native people so i realize the importance of my work and that her presentation. >> one of the things i like about your book is balance and that's important that type of community based upon balance but in the book we had a lot of balance, we balance the topics dealing with sensitive issues that might be sensitive to a non-native person like mike cherokee grandmother was a cherokee princess for the tribal community for enrollment and then you dealt with tough issues like the history of christopher columbus so there's a history lesson and then the ler enjoyment of reading the book. how did you decide what to include and what not to include in this book? >> guest: writing the book happened faster than my resear
toys and he'll play with a stick. but if you take away early childhood education, slash k-through 12 funding, they won't go far. >> jennifer: that ad is airing in colorado, florida, ohio virginia, wisconsin. michelle do you think that that message is effective with parents? swing states? >> i think it's a very compelling ad. it will hit parents, women, children. it's going to hit white middle class voters who firmly believe and understand that the way to be prepared for a 21st century work force is through education. if you live in ohio, wisconsin, michigan, if you live in states where manufacturing jobs are disappearing, you know the way to find a job is education, and for that reason alone, it is a very, very compelling ad. >> jennifer: the nra has come out with a new ad. do you think that because of nra is using a bit of fear in its ads do you think it is going to work in 2012? >> no. i have been to more gun shows than probably any democrat in washington, d.c. and prosably most states around this country. >> jennifer: really? >> yeah, it's one of the things
thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose o
. so we have to get services in there. we have to get education so that we can begin to link the services and begin to intervene as quickly as possible. and when we come back we're going to be talking a little bit more about the dynamics of a family that faces substance and mental disorders. we'll be right back. [music playing] when a family member has a substance abuse or mental disorder, it has a profound impact on the family unit. whether it is the young person who's having an issue and its impact on the siblings and on the parents and their time and effort, their ability to get treatment and help that individual recover. but it's also what happens when a young person has a parent or an adult in their life who is struggling with addiction or who has a mental disorder. so helping the family unit deal with what's going on in the family, as opposed to dealing with just the individual who's having the illness or the addiction, is really critical. when the family discovers that a family member has a mental health problem or a substance use problem, the response of the family de
on banks and insurance companies. we cannot got our investments on education, clean energy, research, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade
level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. mike rowe here at a ford tell me fiona, who's having a big tire event? your ford dealer. who has 11 major brands to choose from? your ford dealer. who's offering a rebate? your ford dealer. who has the low price tire guarantee... affording peace of mind to anyone who might be in the market for a new set of tires? your ford dealer. i'm beginning to sense a pattern. buy four select tires, get a $60 rebate. use the ford service credit credit card, get $60 more. that's up to $120. where did you get that sweater vest? your ford dealer. >>> quite a scene this morning when marco came to town making comments on greek suffering. >> german chancellor was dpreetdpree greeted by protesters today. estimated 50,000 protesters filled the streets. saying many people are suffer i ing. meantime, the number of patients suffering from fungal meningitis climbed today. cases now in ten states as health workers are trying to warn those exposed to the contaminated drug. >>> sandus
for the state of maryland. >> keeping the educational dramatic on the books could help boost the state's economy according to a report just out. the dramatic could -- dream act arrogance to attend college. the report estimates over time the dramatic could have $66 million to state coffers. >> these are estimates based on the assumption that 4500 brenman students to give marriage of -- take advantage of education. all across the state, local supporters have been trying to convince maryland voters to keep the law on the books. if that happens, high-school graduates who live in the state could pay in state tuition. >> if you have lived here in yoyour whole life you should get help from the state to be educated. >> they finished a policy brief. they said it shows the financial benefits of passing the dream act. >> no matter what assumptions we make, the results are that the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs. >> part of their assumption is this is an investment to increase the lifetime earnings of those who benefit. through jobs in tax revenue. >> we look at the debate and saw that there was n
really good academic education but they've also really gotten spectacular education in living with the folks who are the real virginia today. we're increasingly diverse state and that's an important part of medication. -- education. i would hope what the supreme court would do in this case would be they would affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
bullying. so educators there are taking a different approach. here's the view from new jersey. >> reporter: in new jersey, a new anti-bullying law took effect from september 2011. under the state law is bullying reserved, school staff are to look into it immediately, notify the parents, and take steps to tackle it. east hanover middle school had set up messages on the new anti-bullying bill of rights. the school counselor was appointed last year at the school's an -- as the school's anti-bullying specialist. >> so this is, like, my anti-bullying bible. where i have all my information. >> reporter: the law requires each school district to create its own anti-bullying program. the program sets out detailed procedure to follow when bullying occurs and steps for dealing with the bully. when bullying is reported, she and others begin an investigation and contact the offender. they also contact afterschool counseling. the law even stipulas that the student can be suspended or expelled and the case reported to police if it's serious. >> the benefit about this law is that it's a must. so every sch
, and education heeders blasted the chamber's report before its release. >> they're going to put forward one study to say minimum wage doesn't work and there were 20 studies that say it's good for the people in our community. >> the doomsday scenario that the opponents of this measure are empty threats. the real doom day are in the homes of this community that are trying to make ends meet and failing. >> reporter: and so the chamber of commerce has managed to raise $276,000 to fight the minimum wage like. the unions have raised 2/3 of that. this is a closely watched race in november. . >>> also tonight, a hercules neighborhood is remembering a beloved grandmother found murdered in his own home. this comes as the f.b.i. has joined the investigation into this crime. elizabeth cook on what the family is doing on its own to try to find the killer. >> reporter: in a stunning show of support, hundreds of family and friends marched behind susie ko's husband and four children as they walked to the vigil. calvin ko spoke to the crowd. >> everybody -- she was such a good mother, that's why i [ inaudible ] i
to look it up on the website. and the board of education by four aye's and approve the amount made available to reinstate a settlement fund. in the matter of san francisco unified school district versus pierce street the board of education by four aye's and three absent approve authorization for district and insurance company to pursue damage claim through litigation if necessary. for the read out for tonight's closed session september 25, 2012 public employment the board by a vote of six aye's and one absence approved the contract for one assistant superintendent. other items posted in the agenda is the staff report and classified personnel transactions. meeting adjourned. thank you very much. >> thank you, everyone, for coming. i welcome to the opening of scoots san francisco network. [applause]. >> thanks. today, we are opening our beta program to the san francisco public and with that, we are opening the world's first network of shared electric scooters. [applause]. >> there we go, we're back, okay, so before i tell you about our s*frs for san francisco, i want to introduce
year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provi
sacrificed so she and her brother could get an ivy league education. >> i choke up when i talk about this stuff because it is why we're here. >> reporter: needless to say her own daughters inhabit a much different world. sasha is now 11 and malia, a teenager. it's hard enough to be 14 if your parents aren't the president and first lady. how do you help her negotiate that real lly frenc lly teachery of 14? >> we don't do the oh, woe is me thing, she's got a great life, she's got great friends, she's happy. it's kind of hard, especially as we point out, look around. you want to see hardship? you want to see struggle? you don't have it, kid, having the president as your father way down on the list of tough. just like, you'll be fine. >> reporter: she often refers to herself as mom in chief she comes to the role with a high-powered pedigree, graduate of harvard law school he ultimately walked way from her career so her husband could pursue his political ambitions. >> i'm his biggest supporter. >> reporter: are you also, brutally honest? >> i'm honest, absolutely. >> reporter: you think s
for girls to get an education has been shot and seriously wounded. she was on her way home from school when gunmen opened fire on her schoolus, shooting her in the head and neck. she survived and the doctors say she is out of danger. >> liberal that defied the taliban. she was shot at close range for standing up against militants and insisting that girls have the right to go to school. this was her and her beloved classroom when they tried to take it from her. she refused to back down. in 2009, militants controlling the valley decreed that girls' schools must close. then just 11, she voiced her opposition written under a pen name. this was her injury for january 3. >> i was very scared of getting ready for school today because they announced that the girls should stopped going. our teacher told us that if we come, we should not wear a school uniform and where normal clothes. only 11 attended class today. >> after the militants were driven out, they campaigned for recognition for girls. letting the current glut -- recognition and threats. she will fight on if she makes a good recovery. >> sh
about his policies on taxes, education and healthcare. today the candidates foreign policy positions went under the knife during a speech at the virginia military institute. romney laid out a complete reversal on his strategy for mideast peace. >> i recommit america to the goal of democratic prosperous palestinian state living side by side in peace and security with the jewish state of israel. >> the new mitt romney is totally committed to a two-state solution in israel but this is not what mitt romney told a group of wealthy donors in private. >> and i look at the palestinians not wanting to see peace anyway, for political purposes -- of iz real and these thorny issues, and i say there's just no way going to remain an unsolved problem we live with that in china and taiwan. all right, we have a potentially volatile situation but we sort of live with it, and we kick the ball down the field and hope that ultimately, somehow, something will happen and resolve it. >> priceless tape, isn't it? direct from romney's mouth. you hope from is some stability. you hope something will happen. lis
about education and i know what he has said about education. and almost every woman with a child cares about education and cares about health care. so those are the two main issues that women are concerned about. >> reporter: so an eager crowd here waiting for the first lady. she should be on stage in the next few minutes. we'll bring you her remarks. julie cary, news4. >>> a federal judge today scolded the former d.c. county chair for disobeying court orders. brown plead guilty to a felony this summer and was supposed to check in by tephone each week. but he didn't. tom sherwood is here now with the story. >> you can ask any lawyer, if you're facing the jail sentence, you don't want to anger the judge. >> reporter: kwame brown was ordered to court tuesday for failing to check in weekly before he sentenced in november for a felony branch fraud. last summer brown, a former rising star in city politics, resigned his chairmanship and left city politics. his career in ruins. at his guilty plea last summer, he promised to coop. but judge richard leon was told tuesday, he had three times fai
of public education we are never going to be see the gains we need to see with this these sub groups. >> commissioner norton and wynns. >> so i had a couple of questions and i want to echo all everything that has been said before about people doing the work out in the schools and the progress we're making it it's wonderful. i was curious where you know superintendent in your remarks you said "it's doable to close the gap because some of the schools are making such tremendous progress and we called them out and called specifically some of the schools" and commissioner murase makes a great point about funding but when you listed some of the simple strategies going forward some of them match what the high leverage strategies that the principals gave us and some didn't and since we know in some of the schools where this incredible acceleration is going what are we doing to replicate what is happening there across the district? >> it's a very insightful question. i will take the first piece of it and then i will ask deputy superintendent to also chime in. we need to be honest with th
talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it cou
education stuff. we do all the things that a family might need in order to become self-sufficient. there are some very talented, very passionate people, very educated, very intelligent people, but they're just living in an environment with lack of resources. i have five girls and three boys and they help me get-they helped me get them into afterschool programs and also after care and summer programs for them in the summer so they won't have to be around the neighborhood so much. ward 8 is a really strong community and it has a lot of strengths within this community and a lot of times the people within this community aren't given credit for that. and so our job is to really try to build those families up. remove any barrier to them being successful because a lot of times there are enough barriers in people's lives. so just the distance can be a barrier. travel can be a barrier. unfamiliar areas can be a barrier. eliminating those at all costs because eventually we don't want to have to be here. we want to be able to just utilize the resources that were in this community
with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans every step of the way. i would like each of you to speak a little bit about w
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